Your Whole Life Is Borrowed Time

The latest entry from the useful Raptitude blog, which can be found here: https://www.raptitude.com/2018/08/your-whole-life-is-borrowed-time/. I'd sum it up with this quote:

...it gave me a vital bit of perspective: I happen to be alive, and there’s no cosmic law entitling me to that status. Being alive is just happenstance, and not one more day of it is guaranteed.

This thought instantly relieved me of any angst over that particular day’s troubles: technical issues on my website, an unexpected major expense, an acute sense that I’m getting old.

I realise such entries can be trite, but that doesn't stop them being useful when you need a bit of a boost to get on with things.

Q: Why Do Keynote Speakers Keep Suggesting That Improving Security Is Possible? A: Because Keynote Speakers Make Bad Life Decisions and Are Poor Role Models

James Mickens' keynote from the recent USENIX security symposium, which can be found here: https://www.usenix.org/conference/usenixsecurity18/presentation/mickens ; while using humour and a small number of points, a really well put case for more skepticism in cyber security. There are many excellent points made about how technology, especially machine learning, are amplifying mistakes and biases.

I'm not sure about some of the humour, but I really like that the emphasis is on an engaging presentation, that Mickens gets attention to a very important message by being different, and I'm incredibly envious of the presenting format used - featuring animation and other techniques beyond simple slides.

The concept of "Technological Manifest Destiny" is particularly useful to have available in future conversations...

Systemic Innovation e-zine Issue 196, July 2018

This can be found at http://www.systematic-innovation.com/assets/iss-196-jul-18.pdf. I'm hoping to meet up with Darrell Mann from here at some point, I think TRIZ is a very interesting way of approaching the world, and has the potential to solve a lot of problems in innovative and useful ways. In particular this issue of his company's e-zine was intriguing, most notably the article about changes to how the NHS deals with "frequent callers", the few people who appear most often at A&E. Dealing with their underlying problems has lead to huge gains for a particular hospital, and now looks like it'll be rolled out nationwide...