As a former penetration tester, and sporadic wargamer, I am completely sold on the "red team" concept. For those of you not familiar with the area, I'd describe it as "having someone or something with an adversarial mindset examine your nascent idea or project or hypothesis for flaws from the point of view of sentient opposition, and also to extrapolate the second and third order effects from the implementation of that idea". I am still surprised at how rare this point of view is, although I realise that I might be preaching to the converted.

I'm still working on having the kind of reputation where you can now quote me to your managers and get the resource for the Red Team Department you want to set up... but if I can't help, how about Professor David Dunning? David Dunning is "Professor of Psychology at Cornell University. As an experimental social psychologist, Dr. Dunning is a fellow of both the American Psychological Society and the American Psychological Association. " His full details are here: http://socialsciences.cornell.edu/david-dunning/ , he's most well known for his work on the Dunning-Krueger Effect. I had the pleasure recently of listening to him being interviewed for the "You're Not So Smart" podcast, this was episode 72: https://youarenotsosmart.com/2016/04/08/072-why-we-are-unaware-of-how-unaware-we-are/ - it's well worth your time, and these are a couple of particularly useful quotes:

"There are some helpful points that psychology suggests in order to avoid overconfidence that leads you over the cliff, if you will. The first is that, although it's unpleasant, you do want to have nay saying voices involved in any sort of decision that you make. That is, you want someone to play devil's advocate. Basically to poke holes in what the group or the institution might be thinking about what it wants to do. The reason for that is, having a devil's advocate can help the organization spot when it's being overconfident. Or, sometimes just improve the decision that the institution’s going to do. So you want that."

"Having a devil’s advocate is unpleasant ... but what it does do is it does insulate you against unknown incompetence. And you just know that it’s going to show up sooner or later, you just don’t know where. So you might as well just have these policies that help you address the problems that you can’t anticipatewhen they finally rear up and try to bite you."

Episode 72 was a re-broadcast of episode 36, and these quotes are taken from the transcript of episode 36 of the "You Are Not So Smart: A Celebration of Self Delusion" podcast with some minor editing for clarity. The transcript is here: https://youarenotsosmart.com/transcripts/transcript-interview-with-david-dunning-from-episode-036/